The Viet Vegan https://thevietvegan.com Vegan. Feminist. Nerd. Thu, 15 Jun 2017 13:35:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8 Vegan Quiche Stuffed Portabella Mushrooms https://thevietvegan.com/vegan-quiche-stuffed-portabella-mushrooms/ https://thevietvegan.com/vegan-quiche-stuffed-portabella-mushrooms/#comments Fri, 09 Jun 2017 16:05:53 +0000 http://thevietvegan.com/?p=8109 The post Vegan Quiche Stuffed Portabella Mushrooms appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

This vegan quiche stuffed portabella mushroom dish is actually SO easy to make. Filling, satisfying, and full of flavour :)   It’s June now, which means its wedding season. I love weddings. Well, okay maybe that’s not true. I don’t love crowds, dressing up is not my favourite, and I’d much rather celebrate something in […]

The post Vegan Quiche Stuffed Portabella Mushrooms appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

]]>
The post Vegan Quiche Stuffed Portabella Mushrooms appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

This vegan quiche stuffed portabella mushroom dish is actually SO easy to make.
Filling, satisfying, and full of flavour :)

 

It’s June now, which means its wedding season. I love weddings. Well, okay maybe that’s not true. I don’t love crowds, dressing up is not my favourite, and I’d much rather celebrate something in a low-key fashion than with all the pomp and circumstance that comes with weddings. But I do love eating and wedding food is usually pretty awesome.

Unless you’re vegan.

Or you have any number of odd allergies like I do (mostly nut-free on top of being vegan).

The number of formal events I’ve been to this past year alone has shown me that despite veganism coming such a long way, people still don’t have a clue when it comes to making a balanced vegan meal. I didn’t think it was that complicated, but apparently when you take meat out of the equation, a lot of chefs clam up and don’t know what to serve you aside from leaves and a bit of dressing.

Recently I went to a formal event and the first course was an arugula salad with berries, goat cheese, radishes, and beets. Of all those things, I just don’t eat the goat cheese, which is pretty simple to omit, especially because it wasn’t a tossed salad, all the ingredients were just laying on top of the greens.

So colour me surprised when a dish of JUST leaves shows up in front of me while everyone else got colourful watermelon radish, a handful of berries and some peppery radish slices. When I asked for the rest of the salad, I could feel people looking at me like I was being difficult.

I had informed the organizers ahead of time that I was vegan and nut-free, I had talked to the server before people were being served, I had done it all right. And still I get served naked leaves. Like c’mon folks, it’s 2017. It’s not hard to find tofu or vegan cheese in Toronto. It’s not rocket science, it’s a salad.

Now I know it’s not the organizer’s fault. They can’t tick all the boxes themselves, it’s not their job to cook. But chefs in Toronto need to understand how to create balanced plant-based meals. Veganism is here to stay and there are so many ways we can highlight the beauty of plants while still making a satisfying meal. And it’s not just salad, some folks like to replace meat with mushrooms. Mushroom have a wonderfully meaty texture and flavour, but they’re not meat. There are so many ways you can prepare mushrooms to be more robust, so get creative, and be open-minded.

You can do better, Toronto.

So I partnered up with Produce Made Simple again to develop a hearty, vegan dish that uses mushrooms to create a satisfying and satiating dish that is fit to be served at a formal event. Spinach, onion and dill are mixed into this seasoned egg-like tofu and stuffed into wonderful, umami-rich, portabella mushrooms. The mushrooms are baked to tender, juicy, perfection and finished with a crunchy coating of breadcrumbs to give this dish extra flavour and texture and bring it all together.

Serve it at a family dinner or brunch, but either way, you know that your guests are going to walk away satisfied :) Find the recipe here on Produce Made Simple.

The post Vegan Quiche Stuffed Portabella Mushrooms appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

]]>
https://thevietvegan.com/vegan-quiche-stuffed-portabella-mushrooms/feed/ 6
Vegan Raspberry Tarts https://thevietvegan.com/vegan-raspberry-tarts/ https://thevietvegan.com/vegan-raspberry-tarts/#comments Wed, 07 Jun 2017 14:00:05 +0000 http://thevietvegan.com/?p=8095 The post Vegan Raspberry Tarts appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

These vegan raspberry tarts are a simple treat; easy to make, easy to eat =P I forgot how much I enjoy baking. With the eczema on my hands, it’s been hard for me to have the mobility to work with dough and be able to wash my hands without excessively damaging my skin. Every now […]

The post Vegan Raspberry Tarts appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

]]>
The post Vegan Raspberry Tarts appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

Vegan Raspberry Tarts | The Viet Vegan

These vegan raspberry tarts are a simple treat;
easy to make, easy to eat =P

Vegan Raspberry Tarts | The Viet Vegan

I forgot how much I enjoy baking. With the eczema on my hands, it’s been hard for me to have the mobility to work with dough and be able to wash my hands without excessively damaging my skin. Every now and then, when I have the ability to bake again, I’m reminded how much I love the smell of caramelized sugar wafting in the air after a batch of cookies or pie goes into the oven.

It reminds me of that one pretty terrible movie with Mandy Moore, Diane Keaton, and Gabriel Macht before he got big with Suits. In Because I Said So, Mandy Moore bakes up a batch of cookies right before her date shows up at her house so that her house smelled like cookies, and that sort of stuck with me.

Vegan Raspberry Tarts | The Viet Vegan

I wouldn’t say that it’s the reason why I like baking, but it’s definitely one of the things I love about baking. When I was in university, I’d come home and bake cookies for my little brother because he didn’t really like sweets that much except for my soft baked chocolate chip cookies (the key is to underbake them!) I guess I baked them so much that he began to associate the smell of baked goods with me.

There was one time around Christmas time, I had been baking and my friend who was visitng asked my brother if he liked the smell of cookies.

He responded with, “Yes! It smells like Lisa.”

It almost made me want to cry–a little out of love, and a little out of guilt. He was probably around 8 or 9 at the time, and it had been about 3 or 4 years of me being in university in Ottawa, so I had spent nearly half his life away from home.

Vegan Raspberry Tarts | The Viet Vegan

I don’t tend to bake that much anymore–partly because of my hands/eczema, but also because my metabolism can’t handle 3 batches of macaron testing or cupcake testing like it used to. But whenever I do bake, I feel this satisfying feeling that I’m sharing a little good in the world. Paying it forward, one sweet bite at a time, and it makes my house smell good in the process :)

These vegan raspberry tarts were actually for my brother’s school project, where he had to translate a recipe in French. If you want to see us baking together and some silly moments, be sure to check out our video <3

Yields 24 tarts

Vegan Raspberry Tarts

30 minPrep Time

30 minCook Time

2 hrTotal Time

Save RecipeSave Recipe
Recipe Image

Ingredients

    Raspberry Lime Jam
  • 400 g (14 oz) frozen raspberries, or about 2 pints of fresh raspberries
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1 lime, juiced
  • 3-4 tbsp sugar (if you like it tart, stick with 3, if you like it sweeter, try going 4-5 tbsp)
  • 1 tbsp cornstarch
  • 1 batch of the BEST vegan pie crust (add a pinch of salt and 2 tbsp of sugar to this dough since we're making sweet pastry)

Instructions

    Raspberry Lime Jam:
  1. To make the jam, in a small pot over medium heat, cook raspberries, water, lime juice and sugar until raspberries have fully broken down and the mixture is nice and bubbly.
  2. Take out about 2 tbsp worth of the liquid and stir in 1 tbsp of cornstarch to make a slurry. Add back into the jam and stir quickly to incorporate and thicken.
  3. Once thickened, remove from heat and transfer to another container to allow to cool (it'll continue cooking if you leave it in the pot).
  4. Preheat oven to 350F.
  5. To make the tarts:
  6. Roll out chilled pie dough to about 1/8-1/6 of an inch thickness. Cut into 3 inch circles and press into the cavities of a cupcake pan. Press well into the sides to make sure it's fully formed.
  7. Prick the bottoms a few times with a fork to prevent air bubbles while baking.
  8. Fill the tart shells half way with the jam (about 1 heaping tbsp per tart), then bake for 10-12 minutes or until the outside edges are nice and golden. If your oven runs a little cool, you may need to bake longer, but just check them at around 11 minutes.
  9. Remove from the pan and let cool completely on a wire rack before eating. Nobody likes hot raspberry lava burning your mouth :(
7.6.3
424
https://thevietvegan.com/vegan-raspberry-tarts/

The post Vegan Raspberry Tarts appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

]]>
https://thevietvegan.com/vegan-raspberry-tarts/feed/ 1
Vegan Puff Pastry Jam Pockets https://thevietvegan.com/vegan-puff-pastry-jam-pockets/ https://thevietvegan.com/vegan-puff-pastry-jam-pockets/#respond Wed, 31 May 2017 17:41:36 +0000 http://thevietvegan.com/?p=8085 The post Vegan Puff Pastry Jam Pockets appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

While it may not be the most complicated recipe, these vegan puff pastry jam pockets (which are kinda like lazy vegan pop tarts) are a favourite of mine that are ridiculously easy to put together. We finished moving! And I’m feeling light. Despite having an incredible amount of things (mostly kitchen-related because obviously I’m a […]

The post Vegan Puff Pastry Jam Pockets appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

]]>
The post Vegan Puff Pastry Jam Pockets appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

While it may not be the most complicated recipe,
these vegan puff pastry jam pockets (which are kinda like lazy vegan pop tarts)
are a favourite of mine that are ridiculously easy to put together.

We finished moving! And I’m feeling light. Despite having an incredible amount of things (mostly kitchen-related because obviously I’m a food blogger), we managed to pack up our overstuffed little apartment and lugged it to the new apartment. Things are going well–I’m readjusting to not having a dishwasher, which is kind of a bummer, but it was a luxury I wasn’t really used to anyway. I’ve only had a dishwasher for two years, meaning the first 3 years of this wee blog-space created a LOT of dishes I hand-washed myself.

Growing up, our dishwashers were always busted and instead of my mom calling a repair person, she just used it for storage. We stored large cutting boards, big ladles, a butchers knife…anything that didn’t fit in the cupboards and drawers she stuck inside that dishwasher or the oven. (Yes, we stored things in the oven because we barely used it). In case you hadn’t realized, Vietnamese cuisine is almost exclusively cooked on the stove (or over a gas flame).

We’ve been adjusting pretty well: moving to a basement means an uptick in bugs, whereas living on the 11th floor meant it was pretty critter and pest-free. I’ve been doing my best to co-exist among the spiders, since I know that the spider is just trying to live and it’s doing me a favour by eating all the other bugs.

Even still, I don’t appreciate the random corner spiderwebs.

But nobody wants to read about bugs on a food blog.

Lately I’ve been trying to be better about fridge management so we don’t waste food. Trying to eat the fridge empty, and it’s always easier when your fridge is fairly empty to begin with. Cleaning out the old, giant fridge in the old apartment was kind of jarring–literally–it was jar after jar of this condiment and that condiment. I think we lugged 3 bags of hot sauce, curry pastes, and jams to the new place, and that was after throwing out a bunch of really old or nearly empty bottles of sauce.

My day job is mostly in the produce field, so I work alongside farmers and food industry-type folks, meaning I learn a lot about the environmental impact that farming/food has on the world. Did you know that 30% of the food the world makes ends up being wasted? That’s like buying three bags of groceries, and just throwing one out because it doesn’t get eaten or goes off because someone had a craving for instant noodles instead of eating the box of spinach that’s wilting in the fridge. (That someone was me).

Not only is that incredibly awful for the environment, but it’s also so bad for your wallet!! As someone who spends about $50-60 a week on groceries for two people, that’s actually just throwing away $20 every week. About 80$ every month. Nearly $1000 a year!! That’s a new camera lens! A plane ticket, heck, that’s almost a new computer for me.

So I’m trying to be better at eating what I have and eating it all before going out to buy the ingredients to make whatever I’m craving that day. That and trying to eat the food I’ve hoarded. The amount of JAM I had in the fridge was pretty astounding. The jam I used for these puff pastries was from…heck I have no idea. I don’t even remember buying it, it was that long ago.

So goal for future Lisa is to eat the ingredients I splurged on to stop hoarding food and to better curb my food waste.

I know this isn’t the most complicated recipe, but these puff pastry jam pockets are a favourite of mine because it’s an easy sweet treat that is pretty inexpensive and quick. Plus it means I use up the puff pastry and jam I’ve squirreled away for no reason. I also hope you try making your own instead of splurging $3-5 on a café pastry, when you could make about 8 for the same price.

Vegan Puff Pastry Jam Pockets
Save RecipeSave Recipe
Recipe Image

Ingredients

  • 1 package of vegan-friendly puff pastry (see my video for a picture of the packaging)
  • 1 cup of jam of your choice (I used peach spread and strawberry jam for this batch)
  • Flour for dusting
  • 3 tbsp soy milk
  • 3 tbsp coconut palm sugar (granulated or raw sugar would also work well here)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350F.
  2. On a floured surface, roll out puff pastry dough as thin as you can manage (1/8 to 1/6 thickness). Cut into long strips, about 6-8 inches long, 4 inches wide. It doesn't have to be perfect. You can also roll them after you cut them too, to make them even thinner. The thinner the dough, the crispier the pastry will be.
  3. Add 2-3 tbsp of jam to the centre of one side of the long strips, and then fold over, gently push out any air, and crimp to seal the edges, taking care to keep the jam inside. Repeat until you use all the pastry strips.
  4. Place pockets on a lined baking sheet (thick bottomed is best), and cut a small vent hole to allow air to escape during baking process.
  5. Using a pastry brush, paint the pockets with soy milk, especially around the edges, and then finish with a sprinkle of sugar. Use bigger crystalled sugar for a crunchier finish.
  6. Bake for 15-20 minutes (depending on how hot your oven runs), until tops and bottoms are a golden amber. Remove from oven and let cool before eating (lest you eat and get burned with hot jam lava like I did). Enjoy!
7.6.3
423
https://thevietvegan.com/vegan-puff-pastry-jam-pockets/

The post Vegan Puff Pastry Jam Pockets appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

]]>
https://thevietvegan.com/vegan-puff-pastry-jam-pockets/feed/ 0
Canh Khổ Qua Chay (Vegan Stuffed Bitter Melon Soup) https://thevietvegan.com/canh-kho-qua-chay-vegan-stuffed-bitter-melon-soup/ https://thevietvegan.com/canh-kho-qua-chay-vegan-stuffed-bitter-melon-soup/#comments Wed, 10 May 2017 16:00:29 +0000 http://thevietvegan.com/?p=8060 The post Canh Khổ Qua Chay (Vegan Stuffed Bitter Melon Soup) appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

This veganized Vietnamese classic Stuffed Bitter Melon Soup (Canh Khổ Qua Chay) uses a sweetened mock pork seitan to stuff bitter melon with tons of green onion for flavour. The older I get, the more I crave dishes I had as a kid. I remember getting to the dinner table and grimacing once I saw a […]

The post Canh Khổ Qua Chay (Vegan Stuffed Bitter Melon Soup) appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

]]>
The post Canh Khổ Qua Chay (Vegan Stuffed Bitter Melon Soup) appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

This veganized Vietnamese classic Stuffed Bitter Melon Soup (Canh Khổ Qua Chay)
uses a sweetened mock pork seitan to stuff bitter melon with tons of green onion for flavour.

Canh Kho Qua Chay - Vegan Stuffed Bittermelon Sou

The older I get, the more I crave dishes I had as a kid. I remember getting to the dinner table and grimacing once I saw a steaming bowl of this stuffed bitter melon soup. I would sneakily try to eat the other side dishes at the table and avoid this one as much as possible, but my mom would just plop a piece in my little rice bowl and glare at me as I made a face. The young, obedient child I was, I ate it, trying to let the bitter melon take up as much space in my bowl as possible so I didn’t have room for another one, but she’d just put another one in my bowl all the same. I enjoyed the stuffing well enough, but the green, monster-like bitter melon was definitely far from my favourite.

But now, it’s been over 10 years since I’ve been home for this kind of dinner, and over 6 years since I’ve had any meat, and somehow this soup is nostalgic instead of traumatic for me. Despite the fact that I love to cook now, I wouldn’t have learned to cook if it weren’t for my mom dragging me away from the computer or whatever book I was reading to help her in the kitchen. I remember begrudgingly coming down to the kitchen to help my mom cook, and my tasks were usually chopping onions and de-seeding the bitter melon.

Canh Kho Qua Chay - Vegan Stuffed Bittermelon Sou

Suffice it to say, my mom forced me to do a lot of things that I kind of hated when I was a kid–take piano lessons, get my driver’s license, learn how to cook, learn Vietnamese–all skills that I hate to admit, but I really appreciate now. She shouldered the brunt of my angst, my lip and cuttings words as she dragged me to driver’s ed classes or practice Vietnamese, but she knew it was for my own good.

Watching me grumble as I ate my way through 2 or 3 pieces of stuffed bitter melon, little did she know that these small moments would help me remember my roots and make me appreciate the fact that I live in two cultures.

So for Mother’s Day (and as a collaboration with Vegan Lovelie, their recipe can be found here), I’ve made this veganized stuffed bitter melon soup. My mom has been vegetarian for the last few months and has missed a lot of these dishes she used to make. Mom, I’m sorry for all the flack I gave to you as a kid, I hope you know I appreciate it now and I love you.

Happy Mother’s Day <3

Seitan recipe adapted from The Gentle Chef – Skye Michael Conroy‘s Porq Cutlet recipe from Seitan and Beyond (affiliate link).

Canh Kho Qua Chay (Vegan Stuffed Bitter Melon Soup)

30 minPrep Time

15 minCook Time

45 minTotal Time

Save RecipeSave Recipe
Recipe Image

Ingredients

  • 1 portion of dried mung bean noodles (~10-15 g depending on your packages)
  • 2-3 bitter melon gourds, cut into 2 inch pieces and deseeded
  • 15 g of dried, black fungus mushroom (sliced)
  • 225 g (~1 1/2 to 2 cups) vital wheat gluten
  • 2 tbsp onion powder
  • 1 tbsp garlic powder
  • 1/2 tsp white pepper
  • 140 g firm tofu (pressed) (about 1/3 of a typical block)
  • 2 tbsp white miso (low sodium)
  • 2 tbsp grapeseed oil
  • 2 tbsp tamari
  • 3/4 water
  • 5 sprigs of green onion, finely diced
  • 8 cups broth (I used 8 cups water + ¼ cup mushroom broth powder)
  • ¼ tsp black pepper (to taste)

Instructions

  1. In separate bowls of warm water, soak mung bean noodles in one and dried black fungus in another until reconstituted (about 10-15 minutes). Drain and chop into small pieces (about ½ inch or 1-2 cm in length). It doesn’t need to be perfect.
  2. Prepare bitter melon by washing, trimming the ends, and cutting into 2 inch rough pieces (about 4-5 pieces per bitter melon). Use a spoon or paring knife to de-seed and de-pith. Try to remove as much as the white part as possible. Set aside.
  3. In a large mixing bowl, combine vital wheat gluten, onion powder, garlic powder, and white pepper and stir to combine. Add your chopped fungus, 4 sprigs worth of green onion (reserve 1 sprig for the soup), stir and set aside.
  4. Blend the wet ingredients (pressed firm tofu, miso, grapeseed oil, tamari, and water) until smooth and no lumps remain. Pour into bowl of dry ingredients. Mix together until you get a rough dough (it might feel a little tacky, that’s okay).
  5. Turn the dough onto a clean work surface and knead until elastic—it will end up being sort of lumpy looking but will stretch quite a bit before it tears when you pull at it. You shouldn’t need to add any extra vital wheat gluten, but if it’s just so incredibly tacky, the extra moisture from the mushrooms and noodles may require an extra 1 tbsp of gluten. If you have any extra bits of mushroom or noodle sticking out, that’s okay too. It’s not the most beautiful dish anyway, the gnarly bits are part of the charm.
  6. Stuff the hollowed bitter melon with the seitan mixture, you’ll probably use about 2-3 tbsp per piece. Make sure to push out any air bubbles when stuffing it, and smooth the ends of the seitan to be flush with the end of the bitter melon.
  7. While you’re doing that, heat up 8 cups of seasoned broth with the remaining green onion until it reaches a boil. Once boiling, add the stuffed bittermelon and cook at a medium simmer for about 10-15 minutes (until they start to float). Add pepper to taste and enjoy with rice!
7.6.3
420
https://thevietvegan.com/canh-kho-qua-chay-vegan-stuffed-bitter-melon-soup/

Canh Kho Qua Chay - Vegan Stuffed Bittermelon Soup

The post Canh Khổ Qua Chay (Vegan Stuffed Bitter Melon Soup) appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

]]>
https://thevietvegan.com/canh-kho-qua-chay-vegan-stuffed-bitter-melon-soup/feed/ 5
Vegan Gluten-Free Creamy Spinach Pasta with Vegan Chicken https://thevietvegan.com/vegan-gluten-free-creamy-spinach-pasta-vegan-chicken/ https://thevietvegan.com/vegan-gluten-free-creamy-spinach-pasta-vegan-chicken/#comments Thu, 04 May 2017 04:45:17 +0000 http://thevietvegan.com/?p=8031 The post Vegan Gluten-Free Creamy Spinach Pasta with Vegan Chicken appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

This vegan, gluten-free creamy spinach pasta with vegan chicken was made in partnership with President’s Choice®! I’m all about making easy, delicious dinners—Compromise-Free! Something I’ve always loved to do is hosting. The hustle and bustle of gathering plates, refilling drinks, wowing people with delicious food. I kind of hate that I love it so much […]

The post Vegan Gluten-Free Creamy Spinach Pasta with Vegan Chicken appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

]]>
The post Vegan Gluten-Free Creamy Spinach Pasta with Vegan Chicken appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

This vegan, gluten-free creamy spinach pasta with vegan chicken was made in partnership with President’s Choice®!
I’m all about making easy, delicious dinners—Compromise-Free!

Something I’ve always loved to do is hosting. The hustle and bustle of gathering plates, refilling drinks, wowing people with delicious food. I kind of hate that I love it so much because it’s such a gendered thing to like, and while I don’t like to conform to typical femme gender roles, the beauty of feminism is that you are allowed to embrace who you are and what you like to do without being expected to act a certain way. So when President’s Choice® asked me to host a compromise-free event at home for friends and family, I was so excited and pumped not only to throw a dinner party, but also work with PC, a brand I’ve been using since I was 14! (Yikes that’s well over 10 years)

There was just one thing: my apartment is tiny, my oven just broke, and I don’t have a dining table.

So what I did instead was create this crowd-pleasing dish in hopes that next month, when I’m all moved into the new place that actually has space to host people, I can host a dinner party and not try to cram 5 people on a 3 seater couch to eat at our coffee table. If you’ve been following here for a while, you’ll know that I had a brief 3-month-stint as gluten-free (on top of being vegan and tree nut-free), which made my life incredibly difficult while I tried to adjust. It was 3 months of me feeling like a burden to the people around me, people were unsure of how to host me, unsure of where we could go eat where I also had an option to eat. It’s not a fun feeling, always feeling apologetic or embarrassed by all the food restrictions and allergies. Sometimes I get pretty down on myself on the fact that I can’t enjoy the likes of cashew ice cream or almond butter anymore, but since I’m actually able to eat gluten, I realize I don’t have it so bad.

THIS CREAMY SPINACH PASTA IS FOR MY GLUTEN-FREE NERDS <3 After 3 months of going gluten-free, I have a newfound appreciate for anyone who is not only vegan, but also gluten-free AND vegan. It takes an incredible amount of preparation, mental and emotional fortitude, and just sheer knowledge to remember to always read the label and recognize sneaky gluten. I experimented with a BUNCH of different gluten-free pastas, and I found that there were tons out there that turned into a mushy mess. Thankfully, I have lots of awesome readers out there, and some of you suggested I try the PC ones, which are corn-based.

Not only does the corn pasta have a lovely yellow brightness, but it also has this really nice bite to it! There are a ton of different kinds of pasta to try too. PC sent me corn-based couscous (which I had no idea was possible and I’m so excited that there is a gluten-free couscous!), pretzel bites, and corn-based spaghetti as well. For this dish, I wanted something that could scoop up lots of creamy, spinach-y sauce, so fusilli was what worked here. This dish could be great with penne and spaghetti too! Whatever strikes your fancy, after all, there are no compromises here.

Initially for this recipe, I wanted to do a baked, spinach dip pasta type of deal, but my oven broke and so I had to improvise with this instead. If anything, this vegan, gluten-free creamy spinach pasta with vegan chicken is easier, faster, and can be served to hungry guests sooner than later =P I also wanted a vegan chicken to bulk it up and give it some extra texture and protein, but since most vegan chicken products made with a combination of soy and wheat, it was obviously not gluten-free. Instead I tried tearing up tofu to be chicken-like in texture, season it with some salt, pepper, and poultry seasoning and voilà! Vegan chicken! Even Eddie thought it was the vegan chicken we used to get. But no, just regular ol’ tofu.

To see more of the Compromise-Free, gluten-free products that President’s Choice® has to offer, please check out their site here. PC is also hosting a giveaway for a $50 gift card! Enter by tweeting (in the Rafflecopter below) using the #CompromiseFree hashtag and tag me (@TheVietVegan). This giveaway is only open to Canadian residents (Sorry US fam)
a Rafflecopter giveaway

Disclaimer: This recipe is sponsored by President’s Choice®, a brand I’ve been using for over a decade :) If you’ve ever watched my grocery hauls before, you’ll have seen that I shop at No Frills and Loblaws (both PC stores) all the time! Thanks for supporting The Viet Vegan by reading sponsored posts like this one <3

Yields Serves 2 (you can easily double this recipe to serve 4)

Vegan Gluten-Free Creamy Spinach Pasta with Vegan Chicken
Save RecipeSave Recipe
Recipe Image

Ingredients

  • 2 cups of President's Choice Gluten-Free Fusilli Pasta
  • 1 medium onion, finely diced
  • 1 tbsp grapeseed oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced (or 1/2 tsp garlic powder)
  • 1/2 block firm tofu (The full block is 454 g), torn up into rough, pieces (kind of like torn chicken)
  • 1/2 tsp poultry seasoning (I used No Name brand)
  • 1 cup cooked spinach (I used some thawed, chopped spinach)
  • 1/2 cup vegan cream cheese (I used Tofutti)
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/4 cup reserved pasta water
  • 2 tbsp unsweetened soy milk
  • 2 tbsp nutritional yeast
  • 2 tbsp your favourite hot sauce (I used Frank's Red Hot)
  • Black pepper and salt to taste (I used about 1/2 tsp of each)

Instructions

  1. Start by cooking the President's Choice Gluten-Free Fusilli pasta with lightly salted water. Reserve 1/4 cup pasta water and strain once cooked to taste (when it's cooked all the way it'll still have a nice al dente bite).
  2. Meanwhile, in a skillet cook up onion with grapeseed oil over medium heat until translucent. Add garlic and cook until fragrant.
  3. Add in torn tofu ("torn chicken") and toss to coat in onion and garlic goodness. Sprinkle poultry seasoning on top (and garlic powder if you didn't have fresh garlic on hand). Cook until tofu starts to brown, then add cooked spinach and stir to combine.
  4. In another bowl, whisk together vegan cream cheese, garlic powder, reserved pasta water, soy milk, nutritional yeast, hot sauce, salt and pepper until well combined. You should have a nice, thick but pourable sauce.
  5. Add both cooked pasta and this creamy sauce to the tofu chicken pan and stir to coat. Adjust with a splash of soy milk if you find it still a little thick.
  6. Enjoy immediately!
7.6.3
417
https://thevietvegan.com/vegan-gluten-free-creamy-spinach-pasta-vegan-chicken/

The post Vegan Gluten-Free Creamy Spinach Pasta with Vegan Chicken appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

]]>
https://thevietvegan.com/vegan-gluten-free-creamy-spinach-pasta-vegan-chicken/feed/ 5
Vietnamese-Style Stir Fry https://thevietvegan.com/vietnamese-style-stir-fry/ https://thevietvegan.com/vietnamese-style-stir-fry/#comments Wed, 12 Apr 2017 14:00:13 +0000 http://thevietvegan.com/?p=8001 The post Vietnamese-Style Stir Fry appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

This Vietnamese-style stir fry is something I grew up eating, using a simple base of bouillon, soy sauce, and scallion for flavour. A combination of clearing out old pictures on my hard drive and making this nostalgic Vietnamese-style stir fry reminds me of when I was in university completing my Master’s. Every time I’d come home […]

The post Vietnamese-Style Stir Fry appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

]]>
The post Vietnamese-Style Stir Fry appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

This Vietnamese-style stir fry is something I grew up eating,
using a simple base of bouillon, soy sauce, and scallion for flavour.
Vietnamese Style Stir Fry | The Viet Vegan

A combination of clearing out old pictures on my hard drive and making this nostalgic Vietnamese-style stir fry reminds me of when I was in university completing my Master’s. Every time I’d come home to visit my mom and my brother, she’d ship me back to school with a giant tub of this stir fry. With trimmed stalks of gai lan, oyster mushrooms, juicy seasoned tofu, tons of onions and of course, a mountain of deliciously stir fried noodles, I’d devour it in short of two days.

There’s just something about eating home-cooked food by the person who raised you that makes you feel better. I wasn’t okay back then, even though I thought I was. Sometimes I wonder what my mom thought of me during this time—I was this fragile, stubborn girl who was struggling to accept that who and what she wanted wasn’t within her grasp. She was chasing a wisp of a dream, fruitlessly trying to change the boy she fell in love with 6 years ago and nudge him to grow into the life she craved.

It’s incredible how much a person can change in 6 years. Rather, it’s incredible how much you can learn in 6 years when you think you already know yourself. Sifting through countless pictures of food and the occasional sneaky picture of my ex while he was playing guitar or just his rambles while we were waiting for a bus brought back a lot of heart ache that I still hadn’t processed.

That relationship was like a sweater that started to feel like a part of yourself when you put it on: familiar, smelled like home, and became a part of your identity. As I was going through these old pictures, I could see it starting to wear away like holes in the sleeves, thinning at the elbows, the colour beginning to fade. Surprised to find it doesn’t fit anymore, the idea of taking off that comfy sweater made me feel exposed and cold, but I knew I needed a change.

Vietnamese Style Stir Fry | The Viet Vegan

As soon as I broke things off, in an attempt to feel secure again, I went searching for something new. Perhaps I should have just adjusted and learned to cope with myself. But I didn’t. Maybe that makes me weak, but maybe that’s just who I am. I was alone in a relationship for 3 years so I knew who I was. I was living on my own, finding out what I loved to do and making new connections in a new city. I had no soul searching or path finding to do. I just wanted someone to share it all with. Someone to support me and push me when I needed pushing. Someone to meet me in the middle.

Two years ago if you had asked me where I would be today, I definitely would not have told you I’d be living with my partner. Or that we’d be moving into a new home that is one step closer to our dream home. I definitely would not have predicted that friends I had held so near and dear back then would be distant today. I wouldn’t have told you that I have friends all over just because we chatted about vegan food on Instagram.

Vietnamese Style Stir Fry | The Viet Vegan

I also would have never expected to still find wounds from this old relationship now. Every now and then, I say thank you to Eddie for doing something nice to me, and he kind of looks back at me in surprise because I’m saying thank you for something normal. Simple basic things that aren’t a huge deal in the grand scheme of things, but are things I never really experienced before. I don’t have to nag him to take out the garbage or do the laundry. He’ll text me to ask me how I’m doing and look forward to spending time with me, even if it’s just going up and down the aisles at Costco. I never feel like a nuisance to him, or a burden because of my allergies or vegan lifestyle.

I still get angry at myself now for ever allowing myself to be in a place where I felt so broken and alone. That I ever let myself be defined by someone to the point where I started to feel crazy for asking something simple of my partner. Asking myself, “Is this reasonable? Am I crazy? This is normal, right?” For not letting go when I felt things slipping. I tried to push and pull my ex towards the life I wanted even though he still didn’t know who he was or what he wanted to do. We were both lost, but we were even more lost together.

Vietnamese Style Stir Fry | The Viet Vegan

Nostalgia is a funny thing. Deleting old photos can be both exhausting and liberating at the same time. I wasn’t prepared to face these memories, but I guess how prepared can you be to face your past? My hard drive is a little bit emptier and I feel a little lighter on my feet. Two years later I haven’t spoken a word to my ex and it feels weird. Sometimes it feels like that was a made up time in my life and I question if it was real. I deleted him from my life: pictures, stuffed plushies, texts and all. All I have are these old wounds to remind me of who we were, to remind me that sometimes love isn’t enough.

It takes more than love to build a relationship, and two years ago, I had no idea.

Yields 4 full servings

Vietnamese-Style Stir Fry

30 minPrep Time

20 minCook Time

50 minTotal Time

Save RecipeSave Recipe
Recipe Image

Ingredients

  • 1 package of flat rice noodles (I used pho noodles)
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 4 green onions, whites cut into thin diagonal slices, greens cut into 1/2 inch chunks
  • 2 lbs gai lan (or any kind of Asian greens), washed, drained, and cut into even 2 inch pieces*** (you may need to half the stems) (~6 cups of greens)
  • 1 package of puffy tofu balls (~4 oz/120 g), cut in half
  • ~1/4 cup water (I used 2 tbsp + 2 tbsp)
  • 1 tsp mushroom broth powder (you can just use salt or salt + ground mushroom powder if you don't have this)
  • 5 tbsp soy sauce (+ more to taste)
  • Black pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Soak rice noodles in hot water for about 30 minutes until are plump and pliable. Drain and set aside.
  2. In a large wok/pan with high sides over medium heat, cook the whites of the green onions in 1 tbsp of oil. Once translucent, add the stems to the pan and stir to cook. You may need to add a splash of water (~2 tbsp) to get things moving along.
  3. Once the stems are bright green and almost tender (they should have a little bit of bite left at this stage), add the leaves of the gai lan and mushroom broth powder and cook until everything is tender. You may need to add another 2 tbsp of water here so the greens don't dry out.
  4. Add the sliced puffy tofu and 1 tbsp of soy sauce and stir to heat the tofu through.
  5. Add the soaked and drained rice noodles and 4 tbsp of soy sauce. You may also need to add an additional Tbsp of oil here. Stir occasionally to evenly cook the noodles through and distribute the greens throughout the mixture.
  6. Season with black pepper to taste, and serve immediately!

Notes

***For easier cooking, I recommend separating the stems from the leaves since the stems take longer to cook. I didn't do that in my video but TRUST it will be better if you separate them.

7.6.3
415
https://thevietvegan.com/vietnamese-style-stir-fry/

Vietnamese Style Stir Fry | The Viet Vegan

The post Vietnamese-Style Stir Fry appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

]]>
https://thevietvegan.com/vietnamese-style-stir-fry/feed/ 4
Garlic Bok Choy (Vegan & Gluten-Free) https://thevietvegan.com/garlic-bok-choy/ https://thevietvegan.com/garlic-bok-choy/#comments Thu, 30 Mar 2017 06:31:44 +0000 http://thevietvegan.com/?p=7987 The post Garlic Bok Choy (Vegan & Gluten-Free) appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

Garlic bok choy is one of my go tos ways of preparing greens. Crunchy bulbs with tender leaves, smothered in a garlicky sauce <3 Sorry it’s been a while since I posted. There were a lot of things going on, lots of life changes in the works. Lots of things I’m excited for, a few […]

The post Garlic Bok Choy (Vegan & Gluten-Free) appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

]]>
The post Garlic Bok Choy (Vegan & Gluten-Free) appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

Garlic bok choy is one of my go tos ways of preparing greens.
Crunchy bulbs with tender leaves, smothered in a garlicky sauce <3

Garlic Bok Choy | The Viet Vegan | One of my favourite ways to eat bok choy :)

Sorry it’s been a while since I posted. There were a lot of things going on, lots of life changes in the works. Lots of things I’m excited for, a few things I’m quite sad about. But I’ll get into that in a moment. Firstly, garlic bok choy!

As you’ve seen from other posts, I LOVE bok choy. This lemon tahini bok choy is one of my favourite ways of eating it, and this classic garlic bok choy was a favourite side dish of mine when I was growing up and going to dim sum with my family. Some people like to cut the greens into much smaller pieces, some people just half the bulbs, but I like the happy medium of quartering the bok choy. That way, some of the garlic sauce get stuck in between the layers of the bulbs and gives you this incredible juicy bite when you eat it.

And now onto a life update:

Garlic Bok Choy | The Viet Vegan | One of my favourite ways to eat bok choy :)

I’ve always been really weird with change, especially when it came to moving homes. Well, it depends on how you look at it. In the past, when I encounter a big change in my life, it takes me about a month or two to adjust. But I always do, and often the change is welcome.

I desperately needed a change when I left home to go to university. I got stuck in a rut when I finished my undergrad and chose to move to Toronto by myself to do my Master’s.When I found myself stuck in a relationship I couldn’t fix, I took off and started fresh outside of the city. Moving for me has always been cathartic, while also being a big bundle of stress. But every single time I’ve moved, it’s always been for the better.

After a lot of consideration, Eddie and I are downsizing.

We’re leaving our beautiful, rented shoebox and moving to a much less glamourous but much more spacious basement. I was reluctant because I’d be giving up on the gigantic gorgeous window that I use for photography (and just general self-care/sanity), a dishwasher, and the most beautiful kitchen I’ve ever had the privilege of using.

But we’d end up saving money, we get parking spaces (!!) and by some sheer luck and family connections, we get double the space.
Garlic Bok Choy | The Viet Vegan | One of my favourite ways to eat bok choy :)

There are a lot of other small things we’d have to give up, and a few other things we’d gain, and the pros seemed to outweigh the cons, so it looks like I’ll have a new, significantly less beautiful but just as effective kitchen to be cooking out of soon.

And a new space is always a welcome challenge for me to navigate when it comes to photography. This new space has about 4 different places where I could possibly shoot, AND I’d have so much more room for a pantry and my props, so I’m excited. I’m also about 10 minutes closer to Toronto (which sounds negligible, but considering that 10 minutes can shave off 20-30 minutes during rush hour, that’s a pretty big deal.

Anyway, this has been one of the first good days in a long time, so I haven’t really had the energy or inspiration to develop any new and exciting recipes. So here is a simple but super tasty way I love to eat my greens.

Here’s a video version of the recipe if you’re more a visual learner :)

Yields 1-2 servings (I really like bok choy so I eat this all by myself usually)

Bok Choy in Garlic Sauce (Vegan & Gluten-Free)

*** If you like your greens super saucy, up this to 1/2 cup broth or 1/2 cup water + 1 1/2 tsp mushroom broth powder

5 minPrep Time

10 minCook Time

15 minTotal Time

Save RecipeSave Recipe
Recipe Image

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil (I used olive, but grapeseed, canola, or vegetable oil blend works just great)
  • 1 small onion or shallot, sliced
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 4 bulbs of Shanghai or baby bok choy, quartered and washed well
  • 1/3 cup vegetable broth*** (I used 1/3 cup water + 1 tsp mushroom broth powder)
  • 1 tsp cornstarch
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. In a large pan or wok over medium heat, cook onion in oil until translucent. Add garlic and cook just until fragrant (about 1-2 minutes), do not overcook the garlic as burnt garlic tastes bitter.
  2. Add quartered bok choy and a splash of the vegetable broth (just to start steaming the bok choy and keep the garlic from burning). Stir fry the bok choy until the tops are wilted. If you like your bok choy super tender, continue cooking until bulb-part is soft. I like them to still have a bit of crunch. Cook to your liking.
  3. In a small bowl, whisk together the remaining vegetable broth and cornstarch to make a slurry. Once the bok choy has cooked to your liking, add the slurry to the pan and stir immediately to coat the greens in sauce. Once thickened, remove from heat and season with salt and pepper to taste. Since I used mushroom broth powder, I didn't need any salt, but if you're using unsalted vegetable broth, you may need to add some salt.
  4. Enjoy!
7.6.3
414
https://thevietvegan.com/garlic-bok-choy/

Garlic Bok Choy | The Viet Vegan | One of my favourite ways to eat bok choy :)

The post Garlic Bok Choy (Vegan & Gluten-Free) appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

]]>
https://thevietvegan.com/garlic-bok-choy/feed/ 4